House for Duty Associate Priest serving the North Scarborough Group Ministry

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Cloughton
House For Duty

The North Scarborough Group Ministry is entering a new and exciting phase. As a key member you will have the opportunity to be part of developing the Group’s vision.

Our six varied parishes, covering the northern suburbs of Scarborough and nearby villages, are seeking a colleague to join us. We can offer a breadth of ministry including:

  • The opportunity to develop a specialised area of ministry
  • Leading worship, including occasional offices, across the North Scarborough Group.
  • Freedom from having responsibility for a specific parish or attending PCC meetings
  • Committed and collaborative lay and ordained colleagues

The North Scarborough Group Ministry (NSGM) was formed in 2013 to build and sustain ministry across a diverse group of 6 parishes, 8 churches, from St Luke’s, near the hospital in Scarborough, to the small village of Ravenscar situated at the north of Scarborough Deanery.

In the period of discernment before the Group was formed it became clear that a Group Ministry was essential to enable the on-going ministry and mission of the parishes. Today we also see it as a creative partnership that supports leadership within the NSGM and helps sustain and grow individual churches and enables us to flourish and develop in new ways of working together.

As an Associate Priest you will not be tied to the responsibilities of a specific parish but will lead worship including occasional offices and engage in ministry across the six diverse parishes of North Scarborough Group.

A typical week therefore might include a wedding or a funeral at one church, leading Sunday morning worship at another and pastoral visiting or schools work in a third parish, alongside time to develop a particular area of ministry in line with the NSGM’s priorities.

What we would not envisage is the chairing of a PCC, or any of the routine administrative duties linked with a particular parish or church.

The North Scarborough Group Ministry is entering a new and exciting phase. You will be a key member of the Steering Group, attending the monthly meetings, and playing a full part in developing our vision, embodying and communicating it in the parishes, and translating it into action in and across the churches.

The new priest should be:

  • Enthusiastic and willing to support plans for growth.
  • A good communicator who can share with the Incumbents and Steering Group in the leadership of this group of parishes.
  • A person of prayer and deep faith who can encourage, energize and inspire.
  • Has sensitivity to rural and urban life
  • Work well as part of a team of clergy and lay people.

Subject to Enhanced DBS disclosure

The Diocese of York is a family of 607 churches and 126 schools in 470 parishes, which extends from Middlesbrough on the River Tees to Hull on the River Humber, and from the east coast of Yorkshire about as far west as the A1 road.

Led and guided by the Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, our vision is to be a family of Generous Churches Making and Nurturing Disciples. We are currently working through a Diocesan Strategy that focuses on:

  • Reaching those we currently don't
  • Moving to Growth
  • Achieving sustainable finances

Our official website can be found here: http://dioceseofyork.org.uk

Deadline for applications: Thursday 7 February 2019
Interviews are scheduled for: Thursday 14 March 2019

Full details about this opportunity can be found in the attached documents.

For an informal conversation please contact:
The Ven Andy Broom, Archdeacon of the East Riding
T: 01482 881659

Unfortunately it is not always straightforward for clergy from overseas to be appointed to posts in the Church of England. The policy of the UK Border Agency is that normally the organisation making an appointment has been able to prove that it is possible to appoint a person who is a national of a European Economic Area country, before a visa giving permission to work will be issued to a person who comes from elsewhere.